Monthly archives: November, 2015

Corazon Norte: Migrants’ Stories from the Arizona-Sonora Borderlands

Photo Image for Corazon Norte album

Natalia Serna visited the LCC today and shared with us her album titled “Corazon Norte” (Hearts Headed North); released on July 2015. Natalia was born and raised in Colombia, and now lives in Nogales, Sonora where she volunteers at the Kino Border Initiative soup kitchen and plays music at the migrant shelter, San Juan Bosco. Corazon Norte’s music and stories were born from two years of chatting, crying and laughing with migrants who have arrived at that border.

Check out her music at www.lamuna.net or on facebook.com/lamunamusic.

 


Fed Up: It’s Time To Get Real

FedUp_brain2

Last Thursday we had a screening of “Fed Up” followed by a conversation led by Dr. Noel Chavez, Associate Professor Emerita of the Community Health Sciences division at UIC, and Lubna Saleh from the Chicago Partnership for Health Promotion. We talked about how sugar was just one piece of the puzzle that is the mess and broken U.S. Food System that we have in place. Interested in changing that? We suggest checking out the Real Food Challenge, their primary campaign is to shift $1 billion of existing university food budgets away from industrial farms and junk food and towards local/community-based, fair, ecologically sound and humane food sources—what they call “real food”—by 2020.


Legalize Community Radio in Guatemala Now!

Photo of Lorenzo at the LCC

It was an honor to host Lorenzo Mateo Francisco at the LCC on Thursday, November 12th for the last Zona Abierta program of the Fall 2015 semester. Lorenzo is a Q’anjob’al Indigenous leader in Guatemala and Director of the Snuq’ Jolom Konob’ community radio station in Huehuetenango, and member of Prensa Comunitaria. In his talk, “Testimonios: Roots of National Change,” Lorenzo talked about the closing of his community radio station, and how his community is using grassroots media and radio as tools to organize against systems of corruption and privatization.

The LCC, along with the Chicago Religious Leadership Network on Latin America (CRLN), stand in solidarity with Indigenous communities in Guatemala fighting for environmental justice, human rights and access to community radio and freedom of press. The CRLN is collecting signatures to pressure the Guatemalan Congress to take action to pass the pending Community Media Bill (Initiative 4087); which is a bill that proposes legalization of community radio in Guatemala.

Stop by the LCC to sign the petition! #UIC #GHRC #LALS #PrensaComunitaria #Guatemala #IndigenousRights

To learn who is at the forefront of the international struggle for human rights in Guatemala, check out the GHRC’s homepage:


Environmental Justice in the Little Village Community

Antonio Reyes López highlights the local sustainability plan and victories of the Little Village Environmental Justice Organization. This program was recorded by Chicago Access Network Television (CAN TV).


There is no such thing as a single-issue struggle…

Zona Abierta

Conversation with Dr. Antonio R. López, Executive Director of LVEJO, and Kellen Marshall, PhD candidate in ecology and evolution in the Department of Biological Sciences.

This past Tuesday on November 10th, we got to hear from historian and activist Antonio Reyes López talk about LVEJO’s (Little Village Environmental Justice Organization) local sustainability plan and how community members in Little Village are working together for environmental justice at our Zona Abierta  (Open Zone) program. Here is a sampling of tweets, thanks to Kellen Marshall @greenkels who also engaged with Dr. López in conversation:

  • We need to engage decision makers at all levels for healthy land and in
  • @LVEJO local politics/federal/state legislation/gentrification threaten sustained enviro quality of
  • We not only talk about the enviro but address policing and criminalization as well and is just as toxic as a coal plant 

All this reminds us of the powerful quote by Audre Lorde: “There is no thing as a single-issue struggle because we do not live single-issue lives.”